Staircases to Heaven: Ten Ways to Rise Up

Staircases are often seen as an integral part of a building’s history. It can be hard to imagine changing the direction, angle, or placement of stairs in a building, whether it is a new build, or a renovation. So choosing the right type of staircase can be crucial. These are ten ways to create the interior of your dreams.

Straight Staircases

© Trapa

Straight staircases such as these Trapa wooden stairs – which are supported by a flat wall each side – have all their rise along one axis. They take up much more space than those that run in curves or corners. They can be moved to one side of the property which allows architects greater freedom in the layout. Straight is simple in stair terms. They are easier to install and use with a straight trajectory and square treads. However, they are also the most boring. Let’s continue.

Cornering Staircases

© Siller Treppen

There are many types of cornering stairs that can be squeezed into the corners of a floor plan. They can be arranged to occupy a smaller, but larger area on each floor by re-angling their ingress/egress points.

It is easy to see the differences between U-, L-, and S-shaped geometries. A L-shaped staircase like Zig Zag by Siller Treppen features one 90-degree turn at every point. U-shaped stairs, like Melbourne, also from Siller Treppen, make two 90-degree turns and end on the same axis they started on, while U-shaped staircases do not. S-shaped stairs are rarer and curve in one direction, then turn back towards their starting point. S-shaped staircases project in the same direction as straight stairs, but have a more sensual and aesthetic appearance.

Cornering staircases are not only visually appealing, but they can also be used to increase privacy and safety between floors.

Staircases with winders

© Jo-a

Each tread on a straight staircase has a 90-degree edge. However, 90-degree treads placed in corners of staircases can lead to a larger landing step and more space. You can have the same rise with either two or three x 45-degree treads, or three x 30-degree treads (winders), in shorter distances.

Be aware. Be aware that the tighter you turn, the smaller the tread depth on the inside of your curve. This makes it more difficult to safely descend the stairs. However, if safety and space can be managed without any accidents, winding staircases such as this Other Staircase from Jo-a provide a natural curve.

Spiral & Helical Staircases

© MetallArt Treppen

Although often mistaken for one another, spiral and helical stairs could not be more distinct. Spiral staircases, such as these private residence stairs by MetallArt Treppen, are narrower and wrap the thin edge of the winding treads around a pole. Helical stairs feature deeper treads and rise in a steeper gradient with a wider arch. This is what this stunning sculptural example at Asten’s Paneum shows.

Spiral stairs are confined to the floor, but they can be attached to fire poles. However, the enormous opening for a spiral staircase creates a grander and more elegant entrance to a room.

Staircases: Open or closed

© Siller Treppen

Although the treads of open staircases, such as the Cubus floating stairs by Siller Treppen, won’t allow for anything larger than a set keys to pass through them, specifiers and homeowners often dismiss them as unsafe or uncomfortable. It’s not an acceptable thought to get a toddler’s leg caught in one, and I have a limit on how many times my phone screen can be replaced. It is possible to put transparent risers between if it’s a concern. At least, until your phone insurance is up-to-snuff.

Although open staircases can create a modern and minimalist interior, there are many other uses for the space below. Closed staircases, such as this Siller Treppen Zig Zag, can be placed above a storage area, utility room, or pantry.

Cantilevered Staircases

The floating staircase’s minimalist look is appealing, but hiding it in a wall will allow the cantilevered treads, which are essentially suspended from the ceiling, to hover in place. Cantilevered staircases, while being the most modern and striking of all, are more difficult to install and require a large supporting wall as well as a large budget.

Bifurcated Staircases

© Bergmeister Kunstschmiede

Bifurcated staircases are made from one staircase at the lower level and split at the middle landing point. They rise in two opposite directions simultaneously. Although the obvious benefit of bifurcated staircases is obvious – they make it look like you are making a grand entrance to a royal ball, the architectural advantage is that there are two exit points at the top level.

Bifurcated staircases, such as this one, which is elegantly decorated by France Star Railing from Bergmeister Kunstschmiede because of their cost and suitability for high-traffic areas, are not suitable for the most large, most populated properties.

Architectural Ladders

© InQuino

Although they are not suitable for moving between floors frequently, permanent, portable, or folding ladders provide access to areas that are less often used, such as loft spaces or raised sleeping spaces or high storage or home libraries.

Home Lifts

© Aritco

We can use a ladder to cross between levels if we are thinking outside of the box. Let’s look inside. Home elevators, especially those built on platform lift designs like the Aritco HomeLift, take up almost the same space as spiral staircases, but without the added danger or exertion.

Home Escalator

A home escalator is not the most cost-effective, small, or easy option for homeowners who want to be ahead of the curve. Otis, a home elevator manufacturer, has been working hard to develop energy-efficient elevators that are more efficient than traditional linear stairs.

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