Seat Mó eScooter 125 UK review

Move Electric Rating: Four stars out of five

Seat’s decision to use existing technology to make money makes sense. The Mo has all the great features of the Spanish -built Silence SO1 motor, including its 59mph top speed and large under-seat storage. There are multiple riding modes, reverse drive, and a removable battery system. The Seat Mo has been tested on UK roads.

What are we looking at?

The Seat Mo eScooter 125 has a 9KW peak electric motor inside the rear wheel. The propels Mo to speeds of 59mph, 0-31mph (50kph), and 3.9 seconds. The speed of the nearly identical Silence is slightly faster at 62mph. You get the idea. 60 mph is about the same speed as a petrol engine 125cc.

According to the battery, which weighs in at 5.6kWh and 40kg, it can travel up to 85 miles on one charge. From fully dead to fully charged, charging takes six to eight hours using a standard 240v 3-pin socket. You can either charge the bike or remove the battery. (More on that later).

The rear wheel houses the main motor. It is turned on by turning the knob and then it goes silently. There is also a reverse button, which can be activated via the left bar. This button should be held down and you can ‘ride’ backwards by twisting the throttle. However, it can be quite fast. Although I initially thought it was a silly trick, after about a week of riding I discovered that it was very useful, especially when doing a three-point turn using a pillion.

There are three modes of riding: Eco, Cioty, and Sport. Eco limits the speed to 45 mph while City restricts it to 55 mph and Sport gives you full power. Seat claimed a top speed at 59mph but I was able to reach 65mph. It can easily surpass the claimed speed of 59mph (indicated).

The 40-kg battery is kept low in the chassis and not under the seat, as some other bikes do. The weight of the bike is kept low to reduce its weight. It weighs in at around 152kg, which is about 20-30kg more than its main electric or petrol counterpart.

What’s it like to ride?

Handling: The 140-section rear Pirelli Angel scooter rubber is top-notch, and the single rear shock is well-balanced. However, the front forks are not adequate. They feel more like springs than damping, even though I am a former racer. The forks will dive hard if you brake heavily. The forks will rebound if you let go of the stoppers. They can even become overwhelmed on bumpier roads and skid across the surface in extreme situations.

You can use the CBS linked system to make your brakes more progressive and powerful. The linked brakes are my preference, as the front forks can’t withstand the weight transfer when there is firm braking. Despite the higher price, there is no ABS.

There are only three modes that limit the power: no rider aids or traction control. You’d expect connectivity. An app lets you quickly and remotely check how much range and charge you have left. You can also view your journey history and check how much carbon you have saved by choosing electric over petrol. If you lose your bike’s location after a long night, the app will show you its location.

Accessory-wise, there’s a 39-litre topbox available. However, the seat has a lot of storage underneath and plenty of room for two full-face helmets. This is a market-leading product. Seat offers a screen as well as a mobile phone holder. As standard, there is a USB charging port.

What’s the limit?

Seat claims a range of 85 miles (or 137km). Although I was able to manage between 55-60 miles, it was hard riding and sometimes two-up with my son. The Mo must be set to ECO mode in order to reach the claimed 85 miles. However, 55 miles should be sufficient for most commutes of 125cc. You can still recharge the battery even if it is long distance. It is possible to do this by charging the battery at full capacity before you leave for home.

This is the genius part of the Seat: the 40kg battery comes equipped with an extended handle and wheels, similar to a small bag. It is also easy to transport and remove. It’s inventive. The Seat should be placed on its center stand. Lift the seat, place the clip underneath the seat, and then slide the battery out. That’s it! The wheels will automatically turn on. Wonderful.

This has many benefits. First, your 40kg battery can be easily taken into work or home to recharge. The battery acts as a deterrent and makes it impossible to ride the Seat. Other scooters come with removable batteries, but they do not have wheels. No one wants to have to lift 20-40 kilos every day into the office. This is your bike ace card.

Verdict

Seat is introducing a new model of the Silence, which is fundamentally a rebadged Silence. It even has Silence written on the swingarm below the single rear shock. This is a good thing, because Silence is an all-electric scooter that has been tested and proven to be reliable. The design is great and the removable battery makes it easy to transport is brilliant.

The under-seat storage is substantial, the power is sufficient and comparable to a 125cc gasoline scooter. The actual range is 55-60 miles. The brakes are strong and the Pirelli rubber is high quality. The build quality is excellent too. The Mo is well-made and high-quality, despite being almost silent.

It has poor front forks which potential owners will see after a short test drive. The price is also a drawback. This scooter is comparable to a 125cc petrol-powered equivalent.

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